Learning 221: Education in the 2nd decade of the 21st Century

Learning 221 education in the 2nd decade of the 21st century
Presentation Transcript ( PowerPoint slides available at Slideshare.net)
1. Learning 221: Education in the2nd decade of the 21st Century — Prof. M.M. Pant Former Pro Vice-Chancellor, Indira Gandhi National Open University
2. What is the Education Discourse about?• Once upon a time, there lived six blind men in a village. One day the villagers told them, “Hey, there is an elephant in the village today.”• They had no idea what an elephant is. They decided, “Even though we would not be able to see it, let us go and feel it anyway.” All of them went where the elephant was. Everyone of them touched the elephant.
3. First Man”Hey, the elephant is a pillar,” — said the first man who touched his leg.
4. 2nd Man”Oh, no! it is like a rope” —said the second man who touched the tail.
5. 3rd Man”Oh, no! it is like a thick branch of a tree”—said the third man who touched the trunk of the elephant.
6. 4th Man”It is like a big hand fan”—said the fourth man who touched the ear of the elephant.
7. 5th Man• “It is like a huge wall” — said the fifth man who touched the belly of the elephant.
8. 6th Man”It is like a solid pipe” — said the sixth man who touched the tusk of the elephant.
9. Three Questions for this age?What does it mean toknow (something)? How does a learner know that he has learnt (what he set out to learn)?What are the attributesof ‘an educated person’in the 2nd half of the 20thCentury?
10. What would be the attributes/character of a ‘Well Educated person in 2050 ?• Education is increasingly not so much about knowing the right answers to a set of questions, but more about continually questioning the answers.• And therefore asking the right questions is the first and most important step.
11. Summarize our Aspiration As:• Maximize human potential.• Facilitate a vibrant, participative democracy in which we have an informed electorate that is capable of not being ―spun‖ by self-interested leaders.• Hone the skills, capabilities, and attitudes that will help our economy remain prosperous and economically competitive.• Nurture the understanding that people can see things differently – and that those differences merit respect rather than persecution.
12. Goals / Objectives of Education• Helping the learner to be able to rise to the full height as a human being.• Making the learner a ―well educated person‖ for the latter half of the 21st century.• ―Awakening the learner within‖• Remove learning phobias• When the student (learner) is ready, the teacher will appear.
13. The Learning Cycle of an Enquiring MindAsking the Right Question(s)?• Seeking Information• Analyzing Information• Organizing Information• Presenting Information• Persuading others about one‘s views• Reflecting & Raising New Questions
14. The Future is Completely Different from the Past• In the past, educated persons have demonstrated different knowledge and skill sets.• I have been exploring what would be the attributes of an ‗educated person‘ in the future.• Some research led me to views of leading Institutions ( Harvard and Princeton) and thought leaders on the same.• Oliver Van Demille‘s [ American author and Educator] ‗A Thomas Jefferson Education‘ included Harvard‘s list, in addition to two others.
15. Harvard’s list of 10 Skills of an educated person• The ability to define problems without a guide.• The ability to ask hard questions which challenge prevailing assumptions.• The ability to quickly assimilate needed data from masses of irrelevant information.• The ability to work in teams without guidance.• The ability to work absolutely alone.
16. Harvard’s list (cont…)• The ability to persuade others that your course is the right one.• The ability to conceptualize and reorganize information into new patterns.• The ability to discuss ideas with an eye toward application.• The ability to think inductively, deductively and dialectically.• The ability to attack problems heuristically.
17. Princeton’s List of Skills• The ability to think, speak, and write clearly.• The ability to reason critically and systematically.• The ability to conceptualize and solve problems.• The ability to think independently.• The ability to take initiative and work independently.• The ability to work in cooperation with others and learn collaboratively.
18. Princeton’s List (cont…)• The ability to judge what it means to understand something thoroughly.• The ability to distinguish the important from the trivial, the enduring from the ephemeral.• Familiarity with the different modes of thought (including quantitative, historical, scientific, and aesthetic.)• Depth of knowledge in a particular field.• The ability to see connections among disciplines, ideas and cultures.• The ability to pursue life long learning.
19. “In 5 years from now, the besteducation will come from the web.” — Bill Gates ( 6th August 2010)
20. But why?• He believes the web is where people will be learning in five years from now, not Colleges and University.• During his chat he said: Five years from ( 6th August 2010) now on the web for free you‘ll be able to find the best lectures in the world. It will be better than any single University.• Gates‘ reasoning is based on the assumption that education away from the classroom should count as credit. So if MIT release courses on the web, a student should be able to study them at home and get credit for doing so.

1. Learning 221: Education in the2nd decade of the 21st Century — Prof. M.M. Pant Former Pro Vice-Chancellor, Indira Gandhi National Open University
2. What is the Education Discourse about?• Once upon a time, there lived six blind men in a village. One day the villagers told them, “Hey, there is an elephant in the village today.”• They had no idea what an elephant is. They decided, “Even though we would not be able to see it, let us go and feel it anyway.” All of them went where the elephant was. Everyone of them touched the elephant.
3. First Man”Hey, the elephant is a pillar,” — said the first man who touched his leg.
4. 2nd Man”Oh, no! it is like a rope” —said the second man who touched the tail.
5. 3rd Man”Oh, no! it is like a thick branch of a tree”—said the third man who touched the trunk of the elephant.
6. 4th Man”It is like a big hand fan”—said the fourth man who touched the ear of the elephant.
7. 5th Man• “It is like a huge wall” — said the fifth man who touched the belly of the elephant.
8. 6th Man”It is like a solid pipe” — said the sixth man who touched the tusk of the elephant.
9. Three Questions for this age?What does it mean toknow (something)? How does a learner know that he has learnt (what he set out to learn)?What are the attributesof ‘an educated person’in the 2nd half of the 20thCentury?
10. What would be the attributes/character of a ‘Well Educated person in 2050 ?• Education is increasingly not so much about knowing the right answers to a set of questions, but more about continually questioning the answers.• And therefore asking the right questions is the first and most important step.
11. Summarize our Aspiration As:• Maximize human potential.• Facilitate a vibrant, participative democracy in which we have an informed electorate that is capable of not being ―spun‖ by self-interested leaders.• Hone the skills, capabilities, and attitudes that will help our economy remain prosperous and economically competitive.• Nurture the understanding that people can see things differently – and that those differences merit respect rather than persecution.
12. Goals / Objectives of Education• Helping the learner to be able to rise to the full height as a human being.• Making the learner a ―well educated person‖ for the latter half of the 21st century.• ―Awakening the learner within‖• Remove learning phobias• When the student (learner) is ready, the teacher will appear.
13. The Learning Cycle of an Enquiring MindAsking the Right Question(s)?• Seeking Information• Analyzing Information• Organizing Information• Presenting Information• Persuading others about one‘s views• Reflecting & Raising New Questions
14. The Future is Completely Different from the Past• In the past, educated persons have demonstrated different knowledge and skill sets.• I have been exploring what would be the attributes of an ‗educated person‘ in the future.• Some research led me to views of leading Institutions ( Harvard and Princeton) and thought leaders on the same.• Oliver Van Demille‘s [ American author and Educator] ‗A Thomas Jefferson Education‘ included Harvard‘s list, in addition to two others.
15. Harvard’s list of 10 Skills of an educated person• The ability to define problems without a guide.• The ability to ask hard questions which challenge prevailing assumptions.• The ability to quickly assimilate needed data from masses of irrelevant information.• The ability to work in teams without guidance.• The ability to work absolutely alone.
16. Harvard’s list (cont…)• The ability to persuade others that your course is the right one.• The ability to conceptualize and reorganize information into new patterns.• The ability to discuss ideas with an eye toward application.• The ability to think inductively, deductively and dialectically.• The ability to attack problems heuristically.
17. Princeton’s List of Skills• The ability to think, speak, and write clearly.• The ability to reason critically and systematically.• The ability to conceptualize and solve problems.• The ability to think independently.• The ability to take initiative and work independently.• The ability to work in cooperation with others and learn collaboratively.
18. Princeton’s List (cont…)• The ability to judge what it means to understand something thoroughly.• The ability to distinguish the important from the trivial, the enduring from the ephemeral.• Familiarity with the different modes of thought (including quantitative, historical, scientific, and aesthetic.)• Depth of knowledge in a particular field.• The ability to see connections among disciplines, ideas and cultures.• The ability to pursue life long learning.
19. “In 5 years from now, the besteducation will come from the web.” — Bill Gates ( 6th August 2010)
20. But why?• He believes the web is where people will be learning in five years from now, not Colleges and University.• During his chat he said: Five years from ( 6th August 2010) now on the web for free you‘ll be able to find the best lectures in the world. It will be better than any single University.• Gates‘ reasoning is based on the assumption that education away from the classroom should count as credit. So if MIT release courses on the web, a student should be able to study them at home and get credit for doing so.
21. Horizon Report Predictions on use of Technology in EducationTime to adoption horizon one year or less:• 2011: Electronic Books ; Mobiles• 2012: Mobile Apps ; Tablet Computing• 2013: Massively Open Online Courses ; Tablet Computing
22. Horizon Report Predictions on use of Technology in EducationTime to adoption horizon 2 to 3 years:• 2011: Augmented Reality; Game Based Learning• 2012: Games Based Learning; Learning Analytics• 2013: Games and Gamification; Learning Analytics
23. Horizon Report Predictions on use of Technology in EducationTime to adoption horizon 4 to 5 years:• 2011: Gesture Based Computing; Learning Analytics• 2012: Gesture Based Computing; Internet of things• 2013: 3D Printing ; Wearable Computing
24. 6 Reasons: Why Tablets are ready for use in class?• Tablets are the best way to provide knowledge• Students are ready for Tablets• Classrooms are ready for Tablets• Tablets fit into student lifestyle• Tablets are a great way to access the web• Tablets are becoming more affordable (with built-in phone).
25. New Pedagogy• All pedagogical principles were developed in the context of young learners in a classroom for pre- defined learning outcomes.• Then there was ‗andragogy‘ by Malcolm Knowles for adult learning.• We are now in the situation of life-long learning and development of generic skills of learning and thinking.• We have named this new methodology ‗Live Learning‘.
26. The Disruptive Innovation in Education is Personalisation• By creating a Personalised Learning Environment for each learner• Speaking Mathematically it is a function of 3 variables: PLE (Parent, Learner, Educator)• PLEs allow learners to draw connections amongst a matrix of resources that they select and organize to direct their own learning.• PLEs emphasize metacognition enabling students to consider and reflect upon the tools and resources that facilitate their learning.
27. A PLE Transforms the Attitude of the Learner• A terrified learner (petrified)• A reluctant learner• A hesitant learner• An interested learner• An enthusiastic learner• An excited learner• A passionate learner• A gifted learner
28. The Personalized Learning Experience Creates Teachable Moments• An aha moment• A jaw dropping moment• The epiphanic moment• The Eureka moment• The Sputnik moment
29. Education for the 2nd Strand• Altruism• Character• Coping with failure• Courage• Curiosity• Empathy• Grit• Optimism• Perseverance
30. The Soul of a ‘Great Education?• An ordinary education prepares a person for known roles.• A great (quality) education prepares the learner to succeed, flourish, prosper and thrive in an unknown and uncertain future.• Once the learner enters the orbit of self-learnability he can be put in various orbits of knowledge complexity and his trajectories managed by a ‗mission control‘.• The learner is thus a life-long learner continuously guided by not just one, but a community of ‗educators who are not only discipline based academic experts, but also psychologists, neuro-scientists and data and information specialists as well.
31. India can be the hub for Educational Apps• We are almost uniquely placed to develop the new education model for the whole world.• An opportunity for individuals, organisations, both Indian and foreign, to join in this wonderful and exciting opportunity• We need to create an Eco-system to make this happen• Our strong domestic market mirrors the global market
32. MOOCs as the new Paradigm• The term MOOC was coined in 2008 during a course called “Connectivism and Connective Knowledge”• 25 tuition-paying students in Extended Education at the University of Manitoba• Another 2,300 students from the general public took the online class free of charge.
33. Stanford University• In the Fall of 2011 Stanford University launched 3 courses, each of which had an enrollment of about 100,000.
34. Some well known MOOCs or MOOC like• Coursera• Udacity• edX• Academic Room• Canvas Network• CourseSites• Academic Partnerships (a company that helps public universities move their courses online)• Udemy• Straighterline
35. Classrooms of 10,000• MOOCs are Large scale.• Traditional classes have a small ratio of students to teacher, but MOOCs are designed to have a “massive” number of students.• Other features are typically open licensing of content, open structure and learning goals, community- centeredness, etc. but may not be present in all MOOCs
36. Launching a MOOC in a few easy steps• Pick a topic of personal interest and expertise that requires discussions• Preferably a topic that you already teach ; just do it in the open• Focus on audience: Students, Faculty, Life-long learners• Use team teaching : have a colleague to teach with, from a different perspective• Bring in guest speakers, video interviews• Treat content as the starting point of the learning conversation, articles, videos, interactive presentations, conference recordings/proceedings etc.• Leave room for learners to create/share
37. Some Major concerns regarding MOOCs ?• How to you certify the identities of the learners?• How do you assess the learning acquired by large number of learners?• What about currency and credit transfers?
38. Learning Analytics• Learning analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimising learning and the environments in which it occurs• A related field is educational data mining.
39. The Drivers of Learning Analytics• The increasing interest in big data for business intelligence• The rise of online education• Emergence of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), Content Management Systems (CMSs), and Management Information Systems (MIS) for education• Manifold increase in digital data regarding student background (often held in the MIS) and learning log data (from VLEs).
40. The Techniques and Methods of Learning Analytics• Learning Analytics uses several techniques and approaches from different disciplines.• Mathematical techniques (network and graph theory),• Sociological approaches to social networks• Statistical methods for predictive modeling of successful learner behaviour.
41. Open Courseware Consortium• In February 2005, the first meeting of the OpenCourseWare Consortium was held at MIT.• Extend the reach and impact of open courseware by encouraging the adoption and adaptation of open educational materials around the world.• Foster the development of additional open courseware projects.• Ensure the long-term sustainability of open courseware projects by identifying ways to improve effectiveness and reduce costs.
42. UNESCO Declaration on OER• The World OER Congress held at UNESCO, Paris on 20-22 June 2012.• The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 26.1), which states that: ―Everyone has the right to education‖.• The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Article 13.1), which recognizes ―the right of everyone to education‖.• The 1971 Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works and the 1996 WIPO Copyright Treaty.• The Millennium Declaration and the 2000 Dakar Framework for Action, which made global commitments to provide quality basic education for all children, youth and adults.
43. Backdrop to Open Education Resources• 2007 Cape Town Open Education Declaration.• The 2009 Dakar Declaration on Open Educational Resources.• The 2011 Commonwealth of Learning and UNESCO Guidelines on Open Educational Resources in Higher Education.• Noting that Open Educational Resources (OER) promote the aims of the international statements quoted above.
44. Recommends that States within their Capacities and Authority• Foster awareness and use of OER.• Facilitate enabling environments for use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT).• Reinforce the development of strategies and policies on OER.• Promote the understanding and use of open licensing frameworks.• Support capacity building for the sustainable development of quality learning materials.
45. A quick Glance at other Technologies• Gamification• Augmented Reality• Wearable Computers• The Internet of things• Gesture Based Computing
46. Quoting Max Mueller”If I were asked under what skythe human mind has most fullydeveloped some of its choicestgifts, has most deeplypondered over the greatestproblems of life, and has foundsolutions of some of themwhich well deserve theattention even of those whohave studied Plato and Kant, Ishould point to India.’’
47. Quoting Romain Rolland (French Writer, 1866-1944)“If there is one placeon the face of earthwhere all the dreams ofliving men have founda home from the veryearliest days whenman began the dreamof existence, it isIndia.”
48. Margaret Mead US anthropologist & popularizer of anthropology (1901 – 1978)“Never doubt that a smallgroup of thoughtful,committed citizens canchange the world. Indeed, itis the only thing that everhas.”
49. Prof. Elinor Ostrom Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (2009)• American economist Elinor Ostrom has officially become the first woman awarded the the Nobel Prize in Economic Science.• Professor Ostrom is a leading scholar in common pool resources.• A common pool resource (in economics) is a natural or human-made resource system that is considered a common property‗ resource.• The Nobel judges cited Ostroms analysis of economic governance, especially the commons as the reason why Ostrom was awarded this coveted prize.
50. Thank you !Email: mmpant@gmail.comWebsite: http://www.mmpant.net https://mmpant.wordpress.com/

About mmpant

Prof. M.M.Pant has a Ph.D in Computational Physics, along with a Professional Law Degree, and has been a practitioner in the fields of Law, IT enabled education and IT implementation. Drawing upon his experience in world class international institutions and having taught in various modes of Face-to-Face, Distance Learning and Technology Enhanced Training, Prof. Pant is now exploring the nature of institutions which will be successors to the IITs, which represented the 1960s, IIMs, which represented the 1970 and Open Universities which were the rage of 1980s & 90s. He believes that the convergence between various media and technologies would fundamentally alter the way learning would be created, packaged, and delivered to learners. His current activities are all directed toward actual implementation of these new age educational initiatives that transform education in the post Internet post WTO era.. Prof. Pant, has been a Former Pro-Vice Chancellor, Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) and has been on the faculty of IIT – Kanpur (the premier Engineering institution in India), MLNR Engineering College and Faculty & Visiting Professor - University of Western Ontario-Canada. He has been visiting scientist to research centers in Italy, England, Germany & Sweden and has delivered international lectures with about 80 papers published. During his association of almost 15 years with the IGNOU, Prof. Pant has served as the Director Computing and has been the Member of All Bodies (i.e. School boards, Academic council, Planning board, Finance committee and the Board of management). With his interest in Law, backed with practice of Law in a High Court, and his basic training in Science and IT, Prof. Pant has been particularly interested in the Cyber Law, Patent & trade mark issues, Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) issues etc. and has been involved with many activities, conferences on “Law & IT” Prof. Pant is presently; • Advisor to Media Lab Asia - Chairman of working group on ICT for Education, chairman of PRSG handling projects on ICT for education. • Lead Consultant for an ADB funded project for ICT in Basic Education in Uzbekistan • Member of the drafting Group for India’s National Policy on ICT in education • Chairman of the group creating books for class 11 and 12 students on ‘Computers and Communication Technology’ appointed by the NCERT • Preparing a ‘Theme Paper” for the NCTE in the area of ICT and Teacher Training • Advisor and mentor to several leading Indian and Multi-national Companies in the area of education. Prof. Pant has in the recent past been ; • Member – Board of Management – I I T, Delhi for 6 years (two consecutive terms) • One-man committee to create the Project Report & Legislation for Delhi IT-enabled Open University • Advisor to the Delhi Government on Asian Network of Major Cities Project (ANMC-21) distance learning project in association with Tokyo Metropolitan Government. • Chairman Board of Studies, All India Management Association With his mission to create and implement new business opportunities in the area of e-learning & learning facilitation, Prof. Pant has promoted Planet EDU Pvt. Ltd., as its Founder & Chairman, along with a team of highly experienced and skilled professionals from Education & Training, Operations, IT and Finance.
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